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Publications

This section contains scientific articles, reports and other documents related to energy poverty.

O'Sullivan et al.
2013
Language

Prepayment metering is an electricity payment method often used by low-income consumers. Fuel poverty is an important public health problem in New Zealand, and is likely to be a particular problem for those using prepayment metering. This paper details a nationwide postal survey of consumers...Read more

Hales, S., Blakely, T., Foster, R.H., Baker, M.G. and Howden-Chapman, P.
2012
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There was an increased risk of dying in winter for most New Zealanders, but more so among low-income people, those living in rented accommodation and those living in cities. Exact causal mechanisms are not known but possibly include correlated poorer health status, low indoor temperatures and...Read more

Howden-Chapman, P., et al 
2012
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About a quarter of New Zealand households are estimated to be in fuel poverty. NZ has a poor history of housing regulation, so existing houses are often poorly insulated and rental properties are not required to have insulation or heating. Average indoor temperatures are cold by international...Read more

Grimes, A., et al
2011
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We analyse the impacts on monthly metered electricity and reticulated gas use of the houses retrofitted with insulation or clean heat source under the New Zealand Insulation Fund (NZIF) programme, titled "Warm Up New Zealand: Heat Smart" (WUNZ:HS). Our study covers the period from the scheme"s...Read more

O'Sullivan, K., Howden-Chapman, P. and Fougere, G.
2011
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Fuel poverty, or inability to afford adequate heating for a reasonable outlay of expenditure, is a significant and under-researched problem in New Zealand. The connection between fuel poverty, and electricity disconnection or ‘self-disconnection’ is analysed for four cities using prepayment...Read more

Free, S., Howden-Chapman, P., Pierse, N., Viggers, H. and the Housing, Heating and Health Study Research Team
2010
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New Zealand homes are underheated by international standards, with average indoor temperatures below the WHO recommended minimum of 188C. Research has highlighted the connection between low indoor temperatures and adverse health outcomes, including social functioning and psychological well-being...Read more

Chapman, R., Howden-Chapman, P., Viggers, H., O'Dea, D. and Kennedy, M.
2009
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Housing is an important environmental influence on population health, and there is growing evidence of health effects from indoor environment characteristics such as low indoor temperatures. However, there is relatively little research, and thus little firm guidance, on the cost-effectiveness of...Read more

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